Part 3: Addressing A Different Kind Of Resume Gap – Just Graduated

November 19, 2014

pretty african female college graduate at graduation with classmatesToday is Part 3 of a three-part blog series focusing on how to address gaps in your work history. Part 1 explained ways to handle gaps on your resume when you’ve taken time out of your career to raise children, care for elderly parents, or if you were laid off. In Part 2, I provided examples on how to explain work gaps in your cover letter. Part 3 addresses a different kind of gap – when you’ve recently graduated from school and don’t have a lot of work history to include on your resume. Read the rest of this entry »

Part 2: Addressing Work Gaps In Your Cover Letter

November 12, 2014

Close-up of a fountain penLast week I focused on how to handle work gaps in your resume. This week I tackle the topic of ways to address gaps in cover letters. As I mentioned in my previous blog, having a gap in your work history isn’t as big of a deal as most people would think. But if you feel that you won’t get called for an interview if you don’t provide an explanation in your cover letter, then here are a few examples to use as guides: Read the rest of this entry »

Dealing With A Bad Boss: The Micromanager

October 16, 2014

iStock_000026324486Medium_150Last week I discussed ways to deal with a boss who is disengaged, but amiable. This week I’m tackling the subject of bosses who micromanage.

The key to being able to deal with a micromanaging boss is to, first, make sure you’re haven’t caused the situation. If you aren’t the problem, then the next step is to determine your plan of action to move forward, while surviving the bad behavior of your boss. Read the rest of this entry »

Dealing With A Bad Boss: The Disengaged, But Amiable Manager

October 8, 2014

iStock_000010267510Large_150It’s never fun working for a bad boss. But, the odds are pretty high that you’ll work for one (or even several bad bosses) over the course of your career. Believe it or not, the majority won’t be mean bullies; they’ll most likely be managers who are “nice,” but disconnected from the everyday work.

The key to being able to deal with a “disengaged, but amiable” boss is to make sure you’re in mutual agreement with your responsibilities, and then take proactive steps to further your career. Here’s how: Read the rest of this entry »

Who’s In Charge Of Career Planning? YOU

October 1, 2014

iStock_000020215753Medium_150Who is responsible for developing a person’s career? According to a recent survey, there is disagreement about whether it should be the responsibility of an individual or an employer.

“The Real Story Behind Career Development: Who is Responsible?” is a joint research study conducted by EdAssist and the University of Phoenix to explore employees’ and managers’ perceptions of whose responsibility it is to drive career development. The results showed key disparities between the two groups’ perceptions: Read the rest of this entry »

7 Ways To Tell If You’re Ready For People Management Responsibilities

September 24, 2014

Business woman smiling with her team behind her - isolated over whiteOne question I’m asked a lot is how to know if a person is ready to move from an individual contributor role into a job that includes people management. Unfortunately, determining the answer isn’t as simple as taking a few tests, such as the written and driving tests you must pass to qualify to drive a vehicle. Although, it would be nice if it were that easy.

Whenever I’m evaluating clients or employees to determine if they’re ready for people management responsibilities, I look for both content knowledge as well as the ability to consistently demonstrate behaviors that will lead to good people management. If you’re interested in moving into a management role, here are 7 areas you should evaluate: Read the rest of this entry »