How To Use Temporary Work To Uncover Your Career Direction

July 30, 2014

iStock_000041825864Medium_150x150Are you a recent high school or college graduate trying to decide on your career direction? Returning to work after taking time off to raise children or taking care of elderly parents, but not sure about the kind of work that would make you happy? Then you might find it helpful to seek work at a temp agency – because it could help you determine your career direction. Read the rest of this entry »

Job Seekers: Here’s How To Obtain LinkedIn Recommendations

July 23, 2014

iStock_000017000243Medium_150x150In last week’s blog I explained how job seekers can use formal letters of recommendation to help give them an edge when it comes to obtaining a position. This week, I’m focusing on obtaining LinkedIn recommendations.

Many younger job seekers are foregoing formal letters of recommendation and instead, asking people for recommendations they can include on their LinkedIn profile. Then, they choose the recommendations they want to show within their profile and can hide (or unhide) the others. Many of my clients print out their LinkedIn recommendations and provide them to the hiring manager at the end of job interviews instead of formal recommendation letters. Read the rest of this entry »

Job Seekers: Use Recommendation Letters To Give Yourself An Edge

July 16, 2014

iStock_000000133558Medium_150x150“Are you serious?” my twenty-two year old client Brittany (named changed) said, and then rolled her eyes. “You’re going to make me ask people to write recommendation letters? I thought that was something people only did back in the old days.”

Sigh. While I’d like to think I’m not as old as the dinosaurs, there are some days I definitely feel like it. Especially when it comes to discussing the topic of job recommendations with my younger clients. Brittany did have a point, though. The use of recommendation letters has changed over the last decade.

In the past, obtaining recommendation letters was a requirement of the job search process. Today, not as much. Now, this step is considered optional, but savvy job seekers understand that it can help give them an edge when it comes to obtaining a position. Read the rest of this entry »

Why You Should Never Accept A Counter Offer When You Resign

July 9, 2014

iStock_000019508849Medium_150x150It was a moment in my career that I will never forget. I had accepted a new job at a different company and when I went into my boss’s office to quit, with resignation letter in hand, he offered me a higher salary if I would remain in my current job.

Even if you think this would never happen to you, it is best to prepare in advance so you’ll feel comfortable with your response, which should always be: “No, thank you.” Surprised that I’m telling you to decline your manager’s counter offer? Here’s why… Read the rest of this entry »

Job Seekers: Avoid Saying This During Interviews

July 2, 2014

iStock_000013853691Medium_150x150You’re sitting in a job interview and the hiring manager says, “Tell me what you dislike the most about your current (or previous) manager.” Your heart beats faster and the palms of your hands begin to sweat. Uh oh. How should you answer the question? Do you tell the truth about how much you detest your boss? Read the rest of this entry »

Job Seekers: Consider This – Before You Change Jobs

June 18, 2014

iStock_000011434000Medium_150x150Whenever someone comes to me for coaching to obtain a different job or change careers, the first question I ask is, “Why do you want to change jobs?”

It sounds like a simple question, right? But, it’s actually pretty complex, and it often leads to some soul-searching to discover why the person is unhappy in their current job and whether or not changing jobs is in their best interest.

Are you considering a different job? Before you jump into the job seeker process, take the time to consider why you want to change jobs. Grab a cup of coffee, sit down, relax, and write out your list of reasons. Read the rest of this entry »

Managers: 7 Tips For Contentious Employee Terminations

June 11, 2014

iStock_000014105727Medium_150x150In last week’s blog I provided seven tips for laying off good employees when a company must downsize to lower costs. This week, I have shifted the topic to terminating employees due to contentious reasons, such as misconduct or poor performance.

If you haven’t already read last week’s article, I suggest you read it now and then come back to this blog. The foundational tips for laying off a good employee due to downsizing, discussed in my last blog, are just as important (sometimes even more so) when you are faced with a contentious termination. There are also additional aspects you’ll need to consider to protect the employer, other employees, and the employee being terminated. Read the rest of this entry »

Strategic Career Plans Aren’t as Scary as You Think

June 10, 2014

Today'sInspiringWomen_150I recently had the pleasure of being a guest on Deanne Demarco’s radio show “Today’s Inspiring Women.” We discussed the beginning of my career and the moment I realized how beneficial a career strategy could be. I set ambitious goals (reaching the executive level of a Fortune 500 company and having my own business), and a strategic plan allowed me to achieve them faster and more efficiently. Read the rest of this entry »

Managers: 7 Tips For Laying Off Employees Due To Downsizing

June 4, 2014

iStock_000024964415Medium_150x150Ask any manager and they’ll probably tell you that one of the most difficult things they’ve ever had to do was let an employee go due to company downsizing. This is an especially tough situation because these could be loyal and productive employees who have done nothing wrong; there may be no performance or behavior issues – they are being let go to reduce the company’s overall costs.

You might mean well in how you approach a downsizing situation with your employees, but if you don’t think it through and carefully plan out your process, things could go very wrong. Here’s one story I received from a reader: Read the rest of this entry »